Glossary

Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Angora Wool - Wool taken from Angora rabbits, characterized for not causing any allergies, being an alternative to other fabrics.

Alpaca - Wool taken from alpacas, characterized for being soft and long-lasting.

B

Brocade - Decorated fabric, normally with a floral pattern, by a weaving technique done in a loom, characterized for being shinny and having an embroidery effect in its pattern.

C

Canvas - Extremely long-lasting fabric, plain woven (the first fundamental weaving structure), normally used in backpacks, tents, canvas and sails. 

Cashmere - Wool taken from “cashmere” goat characterized for being stronger, lighter and softer than lamb’s wool.

Charmeuse - Lightweight fabric with a satin weave, a smooth finish in the front and a dull finish in the back.

Chambray - Plain woven fabric made from cotton with a mix of blue and white yarn, similar to Denim.

Chenille - Fabric which name is French for caterpillar, animal which fur is similar to the fabric’s fur. This type of fabric is characterized for being soft and firm.

Chiffon - Simple fabric, lightweight with some transparency, woven of alternate S- and Z-twist crepe yarns.

Crêpe - Fabric with a crimped appearance, resulting of weaving with interconnected threads, which form waves. There are different types of crepe, such as the Crêpe de chine or the Georgette.

Cotton - Soft and fluffy fiber, which grows in a boll around the seeds of the cotton plants.

Corduroy - Fabric with a corrugated surface, pattern with tufted cords, also known as bombazine.

D

Denim - Cotton fabric made through the twill weaving (second fundamental structure), where one yarn is died blue and the other is left white, resulting in the fabric being dominated by blue in one side and by white on the other.

 

E

F

G

Gauze Silk - Thin and translucent fabric with an open and loose weaving.

H

I

J

Jersey - Jersey fabrics have the same characteristics of Knit fabrics, with the exception of being thinner and lighter

K

Knit - Fabrics composed of a set of threads twisted on themselves, in order to provide mechanical strength.

L

Lambswool - Wool taken from lambs with 7 months, characterized for being soft and elastic.

M

Merino Wool - Wool taken from merino sheep, characterized for being softer and more expensive.

Monhair Wool - Wool taken from Angora rabbits, characterized for not causing any allergies, being an alternative to other fabrics.

N

O

Organza - Thin, lightweight and with a crimped texture fabric, made with a plain weave (first fundamental structure). This type of fabric is usually used in bridal wear.

Oxford - Weaving structure where the warp and weft are crossed with two picks and one end. This structer is usually used for shirts.

P

Panamá - Weaving structure where the warp and weft are crossed in two.

Plain weave - The most basic weaving structure of the three fundamental ones, being the first of the three. It is characterized for its warp and weft forming a simple crisscross pattern.

Q

R

S

Satin - weaving structure is more flexible than the plain weave and is divided in two types:

  • Satin – in which the warp and weft used in weaving are made of nylon, silk or polyester.
  • Sateen – in which the warp and weft are made of cotton.

 Shetland Wool - Wool taken from “Shetland” goats, which produce various colors of wool, an important aspect since wool is normally produced without being dyed.

Silk - Natural protein fiber produced by certain insect larvae to form cocoons.

Shantung - Silk made by weaving two irregular yarns and known as the wild silk for being the only type in which the silkworm is not in captivity.

T

Twill - Weaving structure characterized for its diagonal pattern with threads crossing perpendicularly.

 

U

V

W

Wool - Textile fiber obtained from sheep and other animals.

Virgin Wool - Virgin wool is the wool taken from a lamb's first shearing. This is the softest and finest wool produced.

 

X

Y

Z

 

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